Wicked Holiday Guide

Wicked Holiday Guide

Wicked Holiday Guide

Boston, MA - November 18: The annual gift of an evergreen Christmas tree from Nova Scotia arrived at Boston Common where it was set in place near Tremont Street on November 18, 2021. A worker is enveloped in the tree as he secures lifting straps around the trunk. The white spruce tree is 48 feet tall and 60-years old. It arrived by sea and then was trucked in because of COVID regulations at the border with Canada. This is the 80th year that a Christmas tree will be lit on Boston Common and the 50th year it is donated as a thank you to Boston from Nova Scotia for the medical help provided after the 1917 munitions ship explosion in the capital of Halifax. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

It’s that time of year again. Time for Boston’s Christmas tree lighting ceremonies. Every year, there are several Christmas trees that get decorated and lit and there are parties and celebrations to go along with them. For some reason, it seems as if the general public is much more in the holiday spirit (and early) than in years past. Today is November 2nd and I already know people who’ve put their Christmas trees up. So, if you’re one of those people who wants to start watching Christmas movies, start listening to Christmas music and wants to watch every tree lighting ceremony in the area, this post is for YOU. The good thing is, ALL of these events are FREE admission.

Boston Tree

Boston, MA – November 18: The annual gift of an evergreen Christmas tree from Nova Scotia arrived at Boston Common where it was set in place near Tremont Street on November 18, 2021. A worker is enveloped in the tree as he secures lifting straps around the trunk. The white spruce tree is 48 feet tall and 60-years old. It arrived by sea and then was trucked in because of COVID regulations at the border with Canada. This is the 80th year that a Christmas tree will be lit on Boston Common and the 50th year it is donated as a thank you to Boston from Nova Scotia for the medical help provided after the 1917 munitions ship explosion in the capital of Halifax. (Photo by John Tlumacki/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

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